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  JFK Airport Info


  Website: http://www.panynj.gov/airports/jfk.html

John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA: JFK) in the borough of Queens in New York City is owned by the City of New York and operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey under a long-term operating lease. It is about 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Lower Manhattan. It is the busiest international air passenger gateway in the United States, handling more international traffic than any other airport in North America. It is also the third-leading freight gateway to the country by value of shipments. In 2013, the airport handled 50,423,765 passengers, making it the 19th busiest airport in the world and sixth busiest in the United States by passenger traffic. Together, JFK International, LaGuardia, and Newark Liberty airports, all operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, are the largest airport system in the United States, second in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and first in the world by total flight operations.

Dedicated as New York International Airport in 1948, the airport was more commonly known as Idlewild Airport until 1963, when it was renamed in memory of John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States.

Over seventy airlines operate out of JFK. It is the base of operations for JetBlue Airways and is a major international gateway hub for American Airlines and Delta Air Lines. In the past, it has been a hub for Eastern Air Lines, Gemini Air Cargo, National Airlines, Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines. It is one of only two airports in North America, the other being Toronto Pearson International Airport, with scheduled direct flights to all six inhabited continents.

Terminals

JFK has six terminals containing 151 gates, numbered 1–8, but skipping Terminal 6 (demolished in 2011) and Terminal 3 (demolished in 2013).

The terminal buildings, with the exception of the former Tower Air terminal, are arranged in a deformed U-shaped wavy pattern around a central area containing parking, a power plant, and other airport facilities. The terminals are connected by the AirTrain system and access roads. Wayfinding signage throughout the terminals was designed by Paul Mijksenaar. A 2006 survey by J.D. Power and Associates in conjunction with Aviation Week found JFK ranked second in overall traveller satisfaction among large airports in the United States, behind McCarran International Airport which serves the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

Until the early 1990s, each terminal was known by the primary airline that served it, except for Terminal 4, which was known as the International Arrivals Building. In the early 1990s, all of the terminals were given numbers except for the Tower Air terminal, which sat outside the Central Terminals area and was not numbered. Like in the other airports controlled by the Port Authority, terminals are sometimes managed and maintained by independent terminal operators. At JFK, all terminals are currently managed by airlines or consortiums of the airlines serving them, with the exception of the Schiphol Group-operated Terminal 4. All terminals except Terminals 2 and 5 (although a new international arrivals hall is under construction for Terminal 5 and it only accepts Pre-Cleared Flights) can handle international arrivals.

Most inter-terminal connections require passengers to exit security, then walk , use a shuttle-bus or using the AirTran JFK to get to the other terminal, then re-clear security.

   Terminal 1
Terminal 1 was opened in 1998, 50 years after the opening of JFK, at the direction of the Terminal One Group, a consortium of four key operating carriers: Air France, Japan Airlines, Korean Air and Lufthansa. This partnership was founded after the four airlines reached agreement that existing international carrier facilities were inadequate for their needs. It was designed by William Nicholas Bodouva + Associates. Terminal 1, along with Terminal 4, has the capability to handle the superjumbo Airbus A380 aircraft, which are flown by Air France on the route from Paris Charles De Gaulle, Lufthansa on the route from Frankfurt Airport and Korean Air on the route from Incheon Airport. Air France operated Concorde here until 2003. Terminal 1 has 11 gates.

   Terminal 2
Terminal 2 opened in 1962 as the home of Northeast Airlines, Braniff and Northwest Airlines, and is now exclusively used and operated by Delta Air Lines. After the demise of Northeast Airlines and Braniff, the building was taken over by Pan American World Airways, and subsequently by Delta. Since the opening of the Terminal 4 addition in May 2013, Terminal 2 has been designated as the “C” gates by Delta, and has 7 Jetway-equipped gates (C60-C63, C67-C70) and 17 stands for Delta Connection carriers (C64A–H, C64J, C66K–N, C66P–S). T2 will be closed once Phase Two of the T4 expansion is completed by 2015.

   Terminal 4
Terminal 4 replaced the former International Arrivals Building in May 2001
Terminal 4 is able to handle the Airbus A380 and was developed by LCOR, Inc and is managed by JFK International Air Terminal (IAT) LLC, a subsidiary of the Schiphol Group. This terminal serves as a major international hub for Delta Air Lines and was the first one in the United States to be managed by a foreign airport operator. Terminal 4 is the major gateway for international arrivals at JFK. Opened in 2001 and designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill,[50] the 1,500,000-square-foot (140,000 m2) building was built at a cost of $1.4 billion and replaced JFK’s old International Arrivals Building, or simply IAB, which opened in 1957.

Terminal 4 has 26 gates in two concourses: A2–A7, B20, B22–B41. As of 2013, Delta and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey agreed[51] to an additional $175 million phase II expansion, which will allow Delta to construct 11 regional jet gates at Terminal 4, as well. The agreement allows Delta to eliminate a proposed physical connection it has previously planned to build with its existing Terminal 2 and instead close T2. The work on the Delta hub has commenced, with funding primarily from $900 million in special-project bonds. Delta will seek funding for the regional jet expansion from the New York City Industrial Development Agency.

Concourse A has six gates, numbered A2–A7. Concourse B has twenty gates, numbered B20–B41, with the exclusion of B21. As Terminal 4 was built during the construction of the AirTrain, the AirTrain station was built inside the terminal building. Other AirTrain stations are built across from terminal buildings. Delta Air Lines has also moved much of its operations to T4, as it expands operations beyond T2, with T3 now closed.

The terminal was recently expanded. The first phase of Delta’s $1.4 billion project at the airport[49] [54]—which includes nine new international gates, additional baggage space, a centralized security checkpoint (moving two checkpoints into one location just after check-in), and customs and border-security facilities—was completed on May 24, 2013. Terminal 4 also serves many international airlines daily, including Swiss International Air Lines, Asiana Airlines, Singapore Airlines, EgyptAir, Emirates, Pakistan International Airlines, Kuwait Airways, Etihad Airways and KLM.

   Terminal 5
Terminal 5 opened in 2008 for JetBlue Airways, the manager and primary (then only) tenant of the building, and serves as the base of their large JFK hub. The terminal was re-designed by Gensler and constructed by Turner Construction, and it is known for its many gift shops and gourmet restaurants, including a steak house and a sushi restaurant. It sits behind the preserved Eero Saarinen-designed terminal originally known as the TWA Flight Center, which is now connected to the new structure and is considered part of T5. The Saarinen building is currently closed for refurbishment; it is unclear when the building will reopen or what purpose it will have. Saarinen also designed the terminal at Washington Dulles International Airport. The active T5 building has 26 gates: 1–12, 14–27. There is no gate 13 at T5. The terminal is also used by Hawaiian Airlines, which announced a partnership agreement with JetBlue and began service in Terminal 5 in June 2012. Aer Lingus moved to the terminal from Terminal 4 on April 3, 2013.[56] On May 31, 2012, JetBlue announced that the Port Authority had approved an expansion to T5 in order to accommodate international arrivals, whereas now non-cleared international JetBlue flights arrive at Terminal 4. The new area will be known as T5i and is tentatively scheduled for completion in November 2014. T5i will sit on part of the footprint of the demolished T6.

   Terminal 7
Terminal 7 was designed by GMW Architects[58] and built for BOAC and Air Canada in 1970. It is currently operated by British Airways. This terminal is the only airport terminal operated by a foreign carrier on US soil, though Terminal 1 is operated by a consortium of foreign carriers serving the building. A variety of Oneworld alliance carriers operate out of Terminal 7 at this time, including British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Iberia (which is owned by the same parent company as British Airways), and Qantas. Star Alliance carriers United Airlines and ANA also use the terminal. Between 1989 and 1991, the terminal was renovated and expanded at a cost of $120 million. The expansion was designed by William Nicholas Bodouva + Associates, Architects.[48] In 1997, the Port Authority approved British Airways’ plans to renovate and expand the terminal. The $251 million project was designed by Corgan Associates[60] and was completed in 2003.[61] The renovated terminal has 12 gates. On May 21, 2008, British Airways announced that it would undertake a $30 million, 18-month-long project to enhance its premium ground facilities at the terminal.

British Airways is currently evaluating the future of Terminal 7, as its lease with the Port Authority ends in 2015. After the alliance between BA/Iberia and American Airlines was finalized in 2010, American began talks to move BA and Iberia into an expanded Terminal 8.[63] BA temporarily moved one of its flights to Terminal 8 in March 2013 due to ongoing renovation work in Terminal 7.

   Terminal 8
In 1999, American Airlines began an eight-year program to build the largest passenger terminal at JFK, designed by DMJM Aviation to replace both Terminal 8 and Terminal 9. The new terminal was built in four phases, which involved the construction of a new midfield concourse, demolition of the old Terminal 9, and finally demolition of the old Terminal 8. It opened in stages between 2005 and had its “official” opening in August 2007. It is a major Oneworld hub, and American Airlines is the major Oneworld carrier at Terminal 8. American is the largest carrier in and manager of the terminal, and is the third largest carrier at JFK. In addition to operations at Terminal 7, some Oneworld airlines including Finnair, Royal Jordanian Airlines, Air Berlin, Qatar Airways, LAN Airlines (and its affiliates), TAM Airlines and US Airways operate out of Terminal 8.

The terminal is twice the size of Madison Square Garden. It offers dozens of retail and food outlets, 84 ticket counters, 44 self-service kiosks, 10 security checkpoint lanes and a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility that can process more than 1,600 people an hour. Terminal 8 has an annual capacity of 12.8M passengers. It has two American Airlines Admirals Clubs and a Flagship Lounge for premium class passengers.

Terminal 8 has 29 gates: 12 gates in Concourse B (1–8, 10, 12, 14, and 16) and 17 gates in Concourse C (31–47).[68] Gate 31 is further subdivided into 5 regional service gates for small jets, 31A–31E. Gate 32 is subdivided into 4 regional service gates for small jets, 32F–32I. The total number of jetbridges is, therefore, 36. Passenger access to Concourse C is by an underground tunnel which includes moving walkways. Of interest are a history of American Airlines logos on display between the security checkpoint and the concourses.